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Open Access Highly Accessed Study protocol

Complicated Intra-Abdominal Infections Observational European study (CIAO Study)

Massimo Sartelli1*, Fausto Catena2, Luca Ansaloni3, Daniel V Lazzareschi4, Korhan Taviloglu5, Harry Van Goor6, Pierluigi Viale7, Ari Leppaniemi8 and Carlo De Werra9

Author Affiliations

1 Department of Surgery, Macerata Hospital, Italy

2 Department of General and Transplant surgery, St Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy

3 Department of Surgery, "Ospedali Riuniti" Hospital, Bergamo, Italy

4 Department of Neuroscience, UT Southwestern Medial Center, USA

5 Department of Surgery, University of Istanbul, Turkey

6 Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, The Netherlands

7 Clinic of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine Geriatrics and Nephrologic Diseases, St Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna, Italy

8 Department of Surgery, Helsinki University Central Hospital, Finland

9 Department of General Surgery, University of Naples "Federico II", Italy

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World Journal of Emergency Surgery 2011, 6:40  doi:10.1186/1749-7922-6-40

Published: 9 December 2011

Abstract

Complicated intra-abdominal infections are frequently associated with poor prognoses and high morbidity and mortality rates.

Despite advances in diagnosis, surgery, and antimicrobial therapy, mortality rates associated with complicated intra-abdominal infections remain exceedingly high.

In order to describe the clinical, microbiological, and management-related profiles of both community-acquired and healthcare-acquired complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAIs), the World Society of Emergency Surgery (WSES), in collaboration with the Surgical Infections Society of Europe (SIS-E) and other prominent European surgical societies, has designed the CIAO study.

The CIAO study is a multicenter, observational study and will be carried out in various surgical departments throughout Europe. The study will include patients undergoing surgery or interventional drainage for complicated IAI.